Analysing an organisations Behaviour, Structure and Processes

Complete the following requirements:

Briefly, describe the actual requirements of the job. Include formal requirements (such as those that may be detailed in a position/job description), and less formal requirements (for example, particular personality characteristics you think are important).

Identify (list) other individuals or groups from inside and/or outside the organisation with whom you interact who are important to your job. These could include your staff (perhaps of various categories), your supervisor, peers, clients/customers, suppliers, regulators and so on. Specify THE PEOPLE, not just the organisation or department, for example, ‘Sonia Mirza, Finance Manager’, ‘Type-setters in the Printing Department’ or ‘Receptionists, Department of Foreign Affairs’ (not just ‘Printing Department’ or ‘Department of Foreign Affairs’).

Describe the principle characteristics of these individuals or groups, particularly those characteristics that impact on their interaction with you. If your list is lengthy, select those five or six individuals or groups who are the most important, who are critical to your ability to fulfil the requirements of your job. (This description should include such things as formal organisational position, demographics such as age or gender, personality, or pattern of interaction with you.) If you have only identified people inside your own organisation, you should briefly explain why people outside your organisation have not been considered.

Describe the nature of the interdependency that exists between you and these critical groups or individuals. That is: in what way do you rely on each other? What do you expect from these groups and individuals? What do they expect from you? You may wish to include formal concepts of interdependence (eg pooled/sequential/reciprocal) in your analysis, but only do so if it enhances your analysis.

Include a diagrammatic representation of these interdependencies. Note this should not be presented as an organisational chart. A typical format for this diagram would consist of you as the focus or centre with the groups and individuals with whom you interact arranged around you. You are welcome to supply an organisational chart in addition as an attachment.

Evaluate the interdependent group (that is, the virtual network your diagram represents: yourself and the groups or individuals with whom you must interact) in terms of its effectiveness and efficiency and the satisfaction of those concerned.

Make recommendations for enhancing the effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction of the interdependent group. These recommendations could include such things as the redesign of the structure and work routines of your department or organisation, or preferred changes in the external environment, such as government regulation or changes in other organisations. Please note: you are not being asked to simply evaluate your managerial style or the effectiveness of your department or organisation.

Format: Report format

Length: 1500-2000 words (exclusive of any attachments).

Worth: 20%

Due date: Week 5

Note: Please keep in touch with your lecturer. This is necessary to make sure that you are progressing well.

The role of theory in this task

This task does not rely heavily on academic reading and explicit theory application. However, your knowledge of concepts and theories met in class and in your reading are likely to enhance your analysis. You are encouraged to complete the set reading for Sessions 1 to 4 as early as possible, as it includes particularly useful material, including coverage of the concepts of managerial functions, organisational culture, organisational environment, interdependence, efficiency and effectiveness.

Please note that your evaluation and recommendations are to be in terms of efficiency, effectiveness and satisfaction. In particular, you must indicate your understanding of the concept of efficiency and theories of effectiveness in the way you make your evaluation and recommendations.

The manager’s job in context: assessment criteria

Assessment will be based on:

the extent to which the task description was fulfilled, both in terms of quality and completeness;

the degree of conceptual clarity demonstrated;

clarity of expression;

correct presentation (i.e., report format, proof-reading, word limit, complete and correct cover page information including signature, gender-neutral expressions etc. according to the General guide and this course description);

Citation of sources in the text, list of references at the end (correct and complete as per APA style).

The manager’s job marking criteria is at the end of this document Appendix 1

4.4.2 Assignment 2: The syndicate research project

The purpose of the task

This task is designed to develop your ability to:

contribute fruitfully to a group task;

assess an organisational issue or problem as objectively as possible;

appreciate the potential of theory in managerial decision making and problem solving;

apply theory to ‘real life’;

take managerial responsibility by designing a practical course of action (rather than merely making recommendations).

Task description

Students will form syndicate groups of around five during class in week 3. Syndicates should identify a problem situation (only one problem) in an organisation they have access to (preferably an organisation where at least one syndicate member works or has worked recently). Do not focus on a problem that has already been solved also do not focus on many problems at the same time.

A presentation covering the following points should be prepared.

Provide a brief introduction to the organisation (it is acceptable to withhold the name of the organisation).

Describe the problem, as much as possible in terms of the observable or measurable symptoms it manifests, for example: increased customer complaints; specific quality concerns; high staff turnover, contracts lost, decreased market share, loss of funding or loss of profit. (Do not conceptualise the problem initially as ‘a leadership problem’, ‘a communication problem’ etc.)

The issue/problem should then be considered and analysed in terms of material drawn from any two topics studied as part of this subject. To give some examples, your syndicate may choose to apply a model of leadership and use strategic planning concepts to examine your problem, or use models or concepts of motivation and organisational culture, or ethics and organisational design. Try to choose the topic models/concepts that seem to offer the most useful insights into the problem. Do not try to deal with many models or concepts. For example, two models, well applied and showing a good understanding of associated concepts would likely to give optimum results. Topics outside course coverage (eg HRM) should not be selected.

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Design an intervention (a change program or set of activities and procedures) utilising some aspect or aspects of your analysis. The intervention should be intended to solve or improve the situation. Please note you are not merely being asked for a list of recommendations.

If you intend to undertake any research, interviewing, distribution of questionnaires or other activities in your organisation you must discuss your proposed approach with your lecturer and obtain your lecturer’s approval before you do so. Your lecturer will discuss your syndicate’s approach with you prior to actual presentation date.

Syndicate members should present their considerations, analysis and intervention design to the class in weeks 8, 9 & 10. The schedule for presenting will be negotiated in class. The presentation should last between 25 and 35 minutes. Each member will present for more or less equal amount of time. You will be penalised for exceeding 35 minutes. An additional 10 -15 minutes is available for class discussion (questions and answers). Support your presentation with appropriate visuals such as computer slides and handouts.

A report of 1200 to 1500 words summarising your presentation must be submitted on the day of presentation. Visual material used in the presentation may be included as an appendix if you wish. Your report must have a cover page duly completed and signed and it has to be fully referenced (only one report from each group).

Syndicate project: assessment criteria

The syndicate presentation grade will be given to all syndicate members. It will be based on:

The presence of an appropriate introduction to the organisation;

The identification and description of a suitable problem for analysis;

Effective use of material from two subject topics in analysing the problem;

Depth of analysis of problem;

Use of analysis in intervention design;

Apparent efficacy of intervention design;

Effective presentation of material;

Utilisation of question/discussion time;

Time management.

Worth: 10%

Syndicate project presentation marking guide is at the end of this document Appendix 2

The syndicate report grade will be given to all syndicate members. It will be based on:

The extent to which the presentation content is effectively reported;

Quality and completeness of response to the presentation topic;

Clarity of expression;

Correct presentation.

Worth: 10%

The syndicate report marking guide is at the end of this document Appendix 3

The Individual grade will be based on a redistribution of the marks made available by the total syndicate grade (presentation and report). Redistribution is on the grounds of peer evaluation, according to the following criteria:

Understanding of the task and topic;

Industry and initiative;

Dependability and integrity;

Participation as a group member;

Attendance at group activities.

Worth: 10%

Peer Evaluation form is at the end of this document (Appendix 4)

Peer evaluation calculation work sheet is available for partner lecturers’ use on request.

4.4.3 Examination

Purpose of the task

This task is designed to develop and demonstrate students’:

self knowledge and understanding of group functioning;

understanding of course content;

ability to apply theory;

time management and decision making skills.

Exam format and arrangements

The third assessable task is a pre-sighted examination, which is completed under closed book conditions. The examination lasts for three hours and consists of two sections. Section A is worth 20% of the total grade for this course, and consists of the following compulsory question:

Section A

Analyse and evaluate your syndicate’s development and functioning as a group or team according to relevant theories and models you encountered in class or in your reading. Discuss your own roles in the syndicate and consider leadership issues. What would you do differently, given your experience and this analysis, to enhance the performance of the group and the satisfaction of its members?

Section B

A set of four questions will be made available in week 12. At examination, three of these questions will be offered. You will have to select two questions to answer.

Each of the two questions answered will be worth 15% of the total grade for this course.

Questions will be drawn broadly from the various topics covered in the course. These questions may also be based on case studies. Lecture notes, the set textbook and supplied reading will provide the necessary knowledge base.

Examination assessment criteria

Assessment will be based on:

the quality and completeness of response to the topics.

For Section A this will include:

the presence of insightful observation, questioning and reflection;

the application of theories and models to one’s own experience in order to better understand the experience.

Worth: 20%

For Section B this will include:

apparent knowledge and understanding of the concepts involved;

reasoning in applying these concepts and/or relating concepts to each other.

Worth: 15 x 2 = 30%

Skills in planning, decision making and time management are implicitly required by the examination process.

5 SCHEDULE:

As semesters and contact hours vary between UB locations, delivery is usually scheduled across three hours a week for 12 weeks. If your location runs this course over less than 12 weeks, your lecturer will adjust the timing of the delivery of the materials.

Please note that the sequence and content of lectures and tutorials may need to be changed and the following information should be used as a guide.

WEEK 1

Briefing: Course overview and class introductions

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Lecture: The Changing Paradigm of Management, organisations and the manager’s role

Tutorial: Preview of learning and assessment tasks. The manager’s job: which manager? An overview of APA format of referencing followed by a mini referencing exercise

Reading: Samson & Daft (2009) Chapter 1

Related reading: Davidson & Griffin (2006) Ch-1; Lamond (1998); Lewis (1993); Mintzberg (1990).

WEEK 2

Lecture: Open systems and the organisational environment. The concept of interdependence

Tutorial: What do managers do (managers log)? Matching exercise (management functions); Open systems and the environment (ANCOL Pty Ltd. Case from OB by McShane & Travaglione, 2007, pp 24-25).

Workshop: The manager’s job – concepts, questions, problems; Report format

Reading: Samson & Daft (2009) Chapter 2 (pp 72-73); Chapter 3 (pp. 87-110); Davidson & Griffin (2006 pp.359-360)

Related reading: Katz & Kahn (1966) Chapter 2; Robbins & Barnwell (2006) Chapters 2 (pp. 9-18) & 8; Spillane & Spillane (1998).

WEEK 3

Lecture: Organisational culture. Organisational effectiveness

Tutorial: What culture fits you best, Effectiveness and efficiency quiz.

Workshop: Syndicate groups have to be formed today. Explain briefly how to proceed

Reading: Samson & Daft (2009) Chapter 3 (pp 111-131); Robbins & Barnwell (2006) Chapter 3

Related reading: Hannigan (1995) Chapter 9; Handy (1981).

WEEK 4

Lecture: Dynamics of behaviour in organisations- individual behaviour,

Communication in organisations

Tutorial: Locus of control, The Crocodile River story

Reading: Samson & Daft (2009) Chapters 14 & 17.

Related reading: Lewis (1993); Spillane & Spillane (1998).

WEEK 5 Assignment-1 due today

Lecture: Teamwork in organisations, Conflict

Seminar/workshop: Belbin team roles- questionnaires; followed by discussion

Tutorial: Communication and interpersonal skills (Avianca air accident case from Management A Skills Approach by Hunsaker, 2005 pp. 73-74)

Reading: Samson & Daft (2009) Ch-18

Related reading: Belbin (1981); (1993); Lewis (1993); McAdam (1993); (2002); Tyson (1998).

WEEK 6

Lecture: Decision Making; Planning and Strategic Management

Tutorial: Strategy (matching exercise), vision, mission exercise, the decision making styles

Workshop: The syndicate project: checking approaches with your lecturer, problems, questions.

Reading: Samson & Daft (2009) Chapters 7-9.

Related reading: Mintzberg (1993); (1998).

WEEK 7

Lecture: Organisational design

Tutorial: Centralisation, formalisation questionnaires

Workshop: The syndicate project: checking approaches with your lecturer (final check)

Reading: Samson & Daft (2009) Chapter 10

Related reading: Mintzberg (1981); Robbins & Barnwell (2002) Ch 4 & 10.

WEEK 8

Lecture: Leadership and Motivation

Tutorial: Syndicate Presentation

Distribution and collection of peer evaluation forms

Reading: Samson & Daft (2009) Chapters 15 & 16.

Related reading: Drath (1993); McAdam (1993); (2002).

WEEK 9

Lecture: Organisational control

Tutorial: Syndicate Presentation

Distribution and collection of peer evaluation forms

Reading: Samson & Daft (2009) Chapter 19.

Related reading: Drath 1993; Ouchi (1980); Robbins & Barnwell (2002) Ch-9.

WEEK 10

Lecture: Managing change and uncertainty.

Tutorial: Syndicate Presentation

Distribution and collection of peer evaluation forms

Reading: Samson & Daft (2009) Chapter 11.

Related reading: Cargill (2006); Hofstede (2005).

WEEK 11

Lecture: Ethics and Social Responsibility

Tutorial: How does your ethics rate? Is your company creative? Samson & Daft (2009), p.432;

Reading: Samson & Daft (2009) Chapter 5.

WEEK 12

Lecture: Globalisation

Tutorial: Who owns what? Check your knowledge

Session will be closed with a brief review of the entire course.

Distribution of pre-sighted version of the exam questions

Reading: Samson & Daft (2009) Chapter 4.

6 ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

Additional useful references:

The following list may be used as a guide. Useful sources are likely to include referred journal articles and texts about general management, organisational behaviour, organisation theory and strategy. The internet can be a useful source for material (but should be used with discrimination) and journal articles may be located via library databases.

Bartol, K., Tein, M., Matthews, G. & Martin, D. (2005). Management: A Pacific Rim

focus (4th ed.). Sydney, Australia: McGraw-Hill. (Also enhanced 3rd ed.)

Belbin, R. M. (1981). Management teams: Why they succeed or fail. Oxford, England:

Butterworth Heinemann.

Belbin, R. M. (1993). Team roles at work. Oxford, England: Butterworth Heinemann.

Brooks, I. (2006). Organisational behaviour: individuals, groups and the organization

(3rd ed.). Harlow, England: Prentice Hall/Financial Times.

Campling, J., Poole, D., Wiesner, R. & Schermerhorn, J.R., (2006). Management (2nd

Asia-Pacific ed). Milton, Qld. Australia: Wiley.

Cargill, K. (2006). Hardening of the categories. Newscape: The Newsletter of the

Society of Counselling and Psychotherapy Educators. September.

Daft, R.L. (2008). Management (8th ed). Mason, Ohio: Thomson South Western.

Daft, R.L. (2004). Organization theory and design (8th ed.). Cincinnati, Ohio: South

Western.

Davidson, P. & Griffin, R.W. (2006). Management (3rd Australasian ed.). Milton, Qld., Australia: Wiley.

Dessler, G. (1995). Managing organizations in an era of change. Fort Worth, TX.:

Dryden.

Drath, W. H. (1993). Why managers have trouble empowering: A theoretical

perspective based on concepts of adult development. Greensboro, N.C.: Center for

Creative leadership.

Eunson, B. (1987). Behaving: Managing yourself and others. Sydney, Australia: McGraw-Hill

Eunson, B. (2005). Communicating in the 21st century. Milton, Qld., Australia: Wiley.

Fulop, L. & Linstead, S. (1999). Management: a critical text. South Yarra, Vic., Australia: MacMillan.

Gettler, L. (2005). Organisations behaving badly: A Greek tragedy of corporate

pathology. Milton, Qld. Australia: Wiley.

Gibson, J.L., Ivancevich, J.M. & Donnelly, J.H. (2000). Organizations: Behavior, structure, processes (10th ed.). Boston, Mass.: Irwin/McgrawHill.

Handy, C.B. (1985). Understanding organizations (3rd ed.). Harmondsworth, Middlesex, England: Penguin.

Hannagan, T. (1995). Management: Concepts and practices. London: Pitman. (Chapter 9 )

Hannagan, T. (2005). Management: Concepts and practices (4th ed.). Harlow, England: Prentice Hall/Financial Times.

Hofstede, G. & Hofstede G. J. (2005). Culture and organizations: Software of the mind (2nd ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.

Katz, D. & Kahn, R. L. (1966). The social psychology of organizations. New York: Wiley. (Chapter 2 )

Lamond, D. (1998). If management is ‘common sense’, why is sense in management so uncommon? Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management, 4(2), 1-9.

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Lewis, R. (1993). A Jungian guide to competences. Journal of Managerial Psychology, 8(1), 29-32.

McAdam, N. (2002). A brain styles model of change responsiveness and distributed leadership in 21st Century network organisations. International Journal of Organisational Behaviour, 5(7), 213-241.

McAdam, N. (1993). In search of the sensitive new age leader. Management, November, 5-8.

McKenna, R. (1999). New management. Sydney, Australia: McGraw-Hill

McShane, S. Travaglione,T (2007). Organisational Behaviour On the Pacific Rim (2 ed.). McGraw Hill: Sydney.

Mintzberg, H. (1990). The manager’s job: Folklore and fact. Harvard Business Review,

68(2), 163-176.

Mintzberg, H. (1981). Organization design: Fashion or fit?. Harvard Business Review, 59(1), 103-116.

Mintzberg, H. (1993). The pitfalls of strategic planning. Californian Management Review, Fall, 32-47.

Mullins, L.J. (2004). Management and organisational behaviour (7th ed.). Harlow,

England: Financial Times/Prentice Hall.

Murray, P., Poole, D. & Jones, G. (2006). Contemporary issues in management and organisational behaviour. South Melbourne, Vic., Australia: Thomson.

Ouchi, W.G. (1980). Markets, bureaucracies and clans. Administrative Science

Quarterly, 25 (March), 129-141.

Robbins, S.P. & Barnwell, N. (2006). Organisation theory: Concepts and cases (5th ed.). French’s Forest, NSW, Australia: Prentice Hall. (Chapter 3)

Robbins, S.P., Bergman, R., Stagg, I., Coulter, M. (2006). Management (4th ed.). Frenchs Forest, NSW, Australia: Pearson/Prentice Hall.

Robbins, S.P., Millet, B., Waters-Marsh, T. Judge, T.A. (2008). Organisational behaviour (5th ed.). Frenchs Forest, NSW, Australia: Pearson Education.

Samson, D. & Daft, R.L. (2009). Fundamentals of Management (3rd Asia Pacific ed.). Vic., Australia: Cengage Learning.

Spillane, L. & Spillane, R. (1998). Locus of control and the assessment of managerial skills. Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management, 4(2), 37-41.

Tyson, T. (1998). Working with groups (2nd ed.). South Yarra, Vic., Australia: MacMillan.

Adopted Reference Style:

APA

The link to the main library (Mt. Helen) citation and referencing website for more information is: www.ballarat.edu.au/aasp/is/library/assignment_research/referencing/index.php.

Appendix 1

School of Business, University of Ballarat

BUMGT 5921 Organisations: Behaviour, Structure, Processes

Semester 2, 2010

Assessment Task No. 1 Managers Job (Report) Worth 20%

Marking Criteria

Student Name: Student ID No:

Assessment Criteria

HD

D

C

P

MF

F

Marks

The extent to which the task description was fulfilled, both in terms of quality and completeness (10.00 marks)

interpreted the instruction/question appropriately

all required tasks have been completed (adequate breadth and depth)

used sufficient and appropriate real-life information to effectively support the key points

The degree of conceptual clarity demonstrated (4.00 marks)

demonstrated understanding of the necessary concepts/ theories involved

demonstrated understanding of the nature and complexities of managerial work

Clarity of expression(3.00 marks)

the writing is fluent, exhibiting grammatically correct sentences that are appropriately punctuated.

there are no spelling or typing errors and due regard is given to rules of capitalisation and abbreviation, gender neutral expression etc.

the introduction is appropriate to the type and format of response and clearly outlines the focus.

the body of the response is well structured, with coherent and logical development of key ideas in appropriate sections/ paragraphs.

the conclusion is appropriate to type and format of the response, successfully summarising the key ideas/issues/findings

Correct presentation(1.00 mark)

the response conforms to the appropriate style guide advice and the specified format (report format)

the writing style is appropriate to the task

complete cover page information with signature

Citation of sources and list of references(2.00 marks)

key ideas from the literature are effectively paraphrased and/or quoted

in-text citations and direct quotes follow referencing guide rules (correct and complete)

reference list appropriately compiled (as per APA style)

Total marks: 20 Marks obtained

Comments:

Lecturer: Location: Date:

Appendix 2

School of Business, University of Ballarat

BUMGT 5921 Organisations: Behaviour, Structure, Processes

Semester 2, 2010

Assessment Task No. 2A (Group Presentation) Worth 10%

Marking Criteria

Group member’s name

Student ID

1

2

3

4

5

Criteria

HD

excellent

D

very good

C

good

P

satisfactory

MF

poor

F

very poor

Marks obtained

The presence of an appropriate introduction to the organisation (0.50)

The identification and description of a suitable problem for analysis (1.00)

Effective use of material from two subject topics in analysing the problem (2.00)

Depth of analysis of issue/problems (2.00)

Use of analysis in intervention design (1.50)

Apparent efficacy of intervention design (1.00)

Effective presentation of material (0.50)

Utilization of question/discussion time (1.00)

Time management (0.50)

[25-35 Minutes)

TOTAL MARKS: 10 Marks obtained

Comments:

Lecturer: Location: Date:

Appendix 3

School of Business, University of Ballarat

BUMGT 5921 Organisations: Behaviour, Structure, Processes

Semester 2, 2010

Assessment Task No. 2B (Group Report) Worth 10%

Marking Criteria

Group:

Assessment Criteria

HD

excellent

D

v/good

C

good

P

satisfactory

MF

poor

F

v/poor

Marks obtained

The extent to which the presentation content is effectively reported (0.50)

Report reflects the presentation material

Quality and completeness of response to the presentation topic (6.00)

The breadth and depth of response

sufficient and appropriate real-life information to support the key points

demonstrated understanding of the necessary concepts/ theories involved

demonstrated understanding of the nature and complexities of problems

Clarity of expression (1.00)

the writing is fluent, exhibiting grammatically correct sentences that are appropriately punctuated

there are no spelling or typing errors and due regard is given to rules of capitalisation and abbreviation, gender neutral expression etc.

Correct presentation: (2.50)

the response conforms to the requirements of the specified format (report format)

Complied with word count

Complete cover page information with signature

in-text citations and direct quotes follow referencing guide rules (correct and complete)

correct and complete reference list (as per APA style)

TOTAL MARKS: 10 Marks obtained

Lecturer: Location: Date:

School of Business, University of Ballarat

BUMGT 5921 Organisations: Behaviour, Structure, Processes

Semester 2, 2010

Consolidated Marks for Syndicate Project

Group Members Name

Student ID

Report mark

(10%)

Presentation mark (10%)

Peer evaluation mark (10%)

Total mark obtained

(30%)

1

2

3

4

5

Over-all comments:

Lecturer: Location: Date:

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